Black-owned businesses helping build University City’s future

Black-owned businesses helping build University City’s future

Check out Black-owned restaurants, shops and services in University City Charlotte Five, an online publication of The Charlotte Observer, recently published a list of more than 100 Black-owned restaurants and other businesses across Charlotte. In honor of Black History Month, we have culled through the full list for those businesses located in University City. We hope you will find both lists helpful. As the Charlotte Five article notes, the pandemic has forced some businesses to close or change their hours and services, so call or visit their websites before visiting. But DO visit. Tomorrow’s vibrant University City is being built by our small businesses today!   Restaurants and bars Anntony’s Caribbean Cafe Jamaican and other Caribbean dishes 6434 W. Sugar Creek Road, Suite F. Map Open Wednesdays-Sundays; closed Tuesdays Dine in, takeout and delivery 704-598-6863 Website Facebook   Big Tank’s Soulfull Kitchen Soul food 2130 E. Arbors Drive, No. 125. Map Open 11 am-8 pm Fri, Sat, Sun (as of Feb. 1, 2021) Dine in, takeout and delivery. 980-355-0366. Website Facebook   Caribbean Hut Caribbean dishes 9609 N. Tryon St. and 3 other locations. Map Open daily. Dine in, takeout and delivery. 704-593-0030 Website Facebook   Island Cuisine Jamaican dishes 5332 Docia Crossing Road at Prosperity Park Drive. Map Open Mondays-Saturdays Dine in, takeout and delivery 980-237-2677 Website   Nick and Mike Bar and Grill Sports bar with American food 11525 N. Tryon St., Suite 7. Map Open daily 980-335-0405 Website Facebook   Quidley’s Restaurant Caribbean cuisine 10901 University City Blvd. No. 106. Map Takeout and delivery 704-910-1781 Facebook Yelp Instagram   STATS Restaurant and Bar American dishes 3425...
Here are ways to observe Black History Month – 2021 style

Here are ways to observe Black History Month – 2021 style

Groups across Charlotte and North Carolina aren’t letting a pandemic get in the way of Black History Month, nor will we. In recognition of the achievements and central role of African Americans in American and Charlotte history, we have assembled links to several Charlotte  and NC virtual events, activities and research that you can explore. Events and activities with University City ties “Why we need Africana Studies” – Essay by Dr. Julia Jordan-Zachery, chair of the Africana Studies Department at UNC Charlotte and award-winning author. MORE “Have You Thanked An Inventor Today?” – Virtual story and activity time for ages 2-4, presented by Mallard Creek Recreation Center, 10:30-11:30 am Feb. 19. DETAILS AND REGISTRATION (required). UNC Charlotte library book recommendations – J. Murrey Atkins Library at UNC Charlotte has assembled an array of fiction, historical texts, essays and memoires on the Black experience in America. MORE “Religion, Racism, & Religious Racism: The Color of Faith Discrimination”: 17th Annual Africana Studies Symposium at UNC Charlotte – Currently scheduled for April 25-26 with opening event at the Center City campus on April 25. Five panel discussions and special presentation by Dr. Abbas Barzegar, on American-Islamic Relations, will take place in J. Murrey Atkins Library on the main campus on April 26. DETAILS AND REGISTRATION Events and activities with Charlotte and North Carolina connections Celebrate Black History Month with Charlotte Mecklenburg Library. The Library’s Black Lives Matter programming initiative has a variety of virtual discussions, story times, book groups, speakers and more to explore and celebrate Black History this month and every month. MORE Black History Month Read-In, by NC African American Heritage Commission....
These Vance High students are dreaming big – They need our help

These Vance High students are dreaming big – They need our help

Just about every part of the high school experience at Vance High has gone virtual or gone away since March 16, 2020, the day that COVID-19 shut the schoolhouse doors across North Carolina. Students haven’t returned to Vance High classrooms for 10 months and counting. In the year of Zoom, Facetime, virtual lessons and televised graduations, faculty member Vikki Harmon and her team of 21 students are determined to give Vance High teens one iconic and lasting memory of their time together, even while apart, even in the pandemic. Their passion? To publish an honest-to-goodness, paper-and-ink Zebulon B. Vance High School 2021 Yearbook. The book also will include a “flashback” section of last year, since the pandemic wiped out the 2020 yearbook, too. Their bold dream? To sell the yearbooks at a price that all students can afford, regardless of their family’s financial hardships due to the pandemic. Your challenge? To help make that dream come true. The biggest need by far is money, but there are other ways you can help, says Harmon, the yearbook advisor. With the book due to the printer on March 15, the yearbook staff needs plenty of support to get across the finish line. Learn more. Contact Vikki Harmon for details at vikki1.harmon@cms.k12.nc.us. Do it today, if possible. Every day counts, especially for our teens in this year of virtual living and...
Check out this light show, courtesy of Duke Energy

Check out this light show, courtesy of Duke Energy

North Tryon Street near the University City Walmart just got a colorful new look between dusk and dawn. At the request of University City Partners, Duke Energy recently added multicolored illumination to its large substation just south of Shopping Center Drive. “They look best the later and darker into the evening it gets!” said Catherine Grella, who represents public engagement for Duke Energy’s Transmission division. Color-changing LED lights are programmed to illuminate the North Tryon Street substation nightly from dusk to dawn. The lights currently go on about 5:30 p.m. The best spot for seeing the lights is on the sidewalk directly in front of the substation, Grella says. LYNX riders will also get a great view, especially as the north-bound trains crest the University City Boulevard bridge. Display can be customized The new light display should not get boring. Engineers can program the lights to create custom colors for specific events, such as green for Charlotte 49ers home games and pink for breast cancer awareness, Grella says. University City Partners is working with Duke Energy to create special lighting schemes to mark major holidays and events. Darlene Heater, executive director of University City Partners, said University City is fortunate to have Duke Energy as a major employer. “Thanks to Duke Energy for gifting us this illuminated art for our community to enjoy during the evening hours,” she...
Help us secure the right home for University City’s library

Help us secure the right home for University City’s library

Money is short, and time is running out. We need your help – NOW – to speak up for our library. (Updated Jan. 6, 2021) Major decisions over the next month will likely decide the location and scale of University City’s next library. The current facility at 301 E. WT Harris Blvd. must soon relocate because the library’s lease is expiring. The two groups that will decide the library’s future – the leadership of Charlotte Mecklenburg Libraries and the Mecklenburg County Board – need to hear loud and clear from our community that we want the future University City Regional Library to have the building it needs at the best location to serve University City and all of Charlotte. SEE BELOW FOR HOW TO CONTACT OUR COUNTY COMMISSIONERS An exciting opportunity for University City’s future Developer EB Arrow’s announcement in July 2019 that it would help transform University Place by including a 40,000-square-foot library building in its Waters Edge project seemed like the perfect solution. This new home (just to the left of the main office building in this image) could follow in the footsteps of the South County Regional Library, now being renovated and expanded to 39,000 square feet. Leveraging the $1.1 billion LYNX investment University City Partners believes that having a library facility that’s nearly twice the size of the current one, equipping it with the latest technology and programming, and locating it in a dynamic urban center within a short walk of the LYNX light-rail line, will meet the library system’s stated goal of establishing libraries as the 21st Century “public commons” for their communities. A...
Teens’ hopes fly high in NASA Challenge

Teens’ hopes fly high in NASA Challenge

The future of NASA exploration – or at least the dreams of several teenagers – recently flew down the dirt-bike track at Hornet’s Nest Park. The teens, members of the Vision Builder Adventures program, were testing their emerging entry in the 2021 NASA Rover Challenge. “Testing the Rover was wild and awesome fun!” said Marshall George, a student leader with Vision Builders. Johnny White founded Vision Builder Adventures 14 years ago to help area youth learn and have fun through projects. That vision fits perfectly with the Rover Challenge. “Each year, the NASA Human Exploration Rover Challenge features an engineering design challenge to engage students worldwide in the next phase of human space exploration,” the Rover Challenge website says. “The competition challenges high-school and college students to create a vehicle designed to traverse the simulated surface of another world.” The Vision Builder Rover team comes from several area high schools, including the Cato Middle College High at Central Piedmont Community College’s Cato Campus in University City. The team includes: Warren Floyd, sophomore at Olympic High School Marshall George, senior at Central Cabarrus High School Major George, junior at Central Cabarrus High School Jacob Kim, senior at Audrey Kell High School Hannah White, CATO Middle College High Last year, Vision Builder took a large group of students to the NASA center in Alabama. “This time, we’re taking the kids who are able to do the fabricating and able to do all of the other activities” required to design and field a competitive rover. “These are sharp kids!” Months of work The Vision Builder team began working on the project in...